Make the Most of Your Treatment

Read the information below to learn about what to do before, during, and after your Acthar treatment.

Tell your doctor if you're taking other medications while using Acthar so he or she can instruct you regarding any possible changes. Continue any current treatments as prescribed unless your doctor says otherwise.

Temperature considerations

Acthar requires special handling. Keep it refrigerated at 36°F-46°F (2°C-8°C) until you're ready to use it. Do not inject Acthar directly after removing it from the refrigerator.

Before injecting, the vial of Acthar should be warmed to room temperature. You can do this by rolling it between your hands or by holding it under your arm for a few minutes.

Prepare for Injections

See what important steps are needed before starting your Acthar injection.

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Talk With Your Doctor

It is important to have a conversation with your doctor before starting Acthar.

Learn about long-term support from ActharPACT1:07

Here are some suggestions for choosing where to inject:

  • Ask your doctor or nurse which injection areas may be best for you
  • You can inject into the same area more than once a week, but rotate the injection sites in that area each time, keeping 1 inch between sites

For more information about injecting Acthar, learn about our free Home Injection Training Services.

Do not inject into:

  • Same site more than once a week
  • An area that has skin irritation
  • An area that has hardened or is sensitive to touch
  • Tattoos, warts, scars, or birthmarks
  • Stomach
  • Knee or groin area

Contact your doctor if you notice any injection site reactions, including redness, pain, and swelling.

Do not do the following with any used supplies:

  • Reuse syringes, needles, and vials (once empty)
  • Throw the syringes, needles, and vials in household trash
  • Recycle syringes, needles, and vials
  • Use a clear plastic or glass container for disposal

Before ending Acthar treatment

Even if you're feeling better, do not stop taking Acthar without consulting your doctor. If you consider ending treatment before your full course is over, be sure to talk with your doctor as well.

Your doctor will talk to you about when and how to stop treatment with Acthar. He or she may tell you how to gradually reduce the dose and frequency of injections. Do not suddenly stop taking Acthar without talking to your doctor first.

Missing a dose

If you have missed a dose or taken more than prescribed, contact your healthcare provider right away for instructions about how to take your next dose of Acthar.

Storing Acthar

Learn how to properly store Acthar.

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Fitting Acthar Into Your Daily Schedule

Hear how Acthar can fit into your daily schedule with support from ActharPACT.

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Your healthcare professional will provide instructions on how to properly dispose of used syringes, needles, and vials. If you're unsure about disposal, bring your container of used supplies to your doctor's office or local hospital.

It's important for you to follow state and local laws when disposing of used supplies. Many states require you to:

  • Place used syringes, needles, and vials in a heavy plastic or metal container with a tight-fitting, puncture-resistant, and leak-proof lid. You can also ask your pharmacist for a "sharps container" or use a laundry detergent bottle
  • Mark "Not for Recycling" on the container
    • Reinforce the lid with heavy-duty tape
    • Store the container in a secure place out of reach of children or pets

While treatment plays an important role, maintaining a healthy lifestyle can also help manage the effects of your kidney disease. Learn more about healthy living with proteinuria.

For information about Acthar and proteinuria in nephrotic syndrome, download the Injection Guide.

Important Safety Information

Who should not take Acthar?

You should not take Acthar if you have:

  • A skin condition called scleroderma
  • Bone density loss or osteoporosis
  • Any infections, including fungal, bacterial, or viral
  • Eye problems, such as ocular herpes simplex
  • Had recent surgery
  • Stomach ulcers or a history of ulcers
  • Heart problems
  • High blood pressure
  • Allergies to pig-derived proteins
  • Been recently given a vaccine or are about to take one
  • Suspected congenital infections (in children under 2 years of age)
  • A condition where your adrenal glands produce either too much of certain hormones (as with Cushing's syndrome), or not enough (adrenal insufficiency)

Tell your doctor if you have any of these conditions or any other health problems. Also, share with your doctor what medicines you are taking. Don't forget to mention nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

What is the most important information
I should know about Acthar?

  • Never inject Acthar directly into a vein, and always take Acthar as prescribed by your doctor
  • Never stop treatment suddenly unless your doctor tells you to
  • Try not to miss any scheduled doctor's appointments, as it is important for the doctor to monitor you while taking Acthar

Acthar can cause side effects similar to those with steroid treatments. While taking Acthar, tell your doctor right away if you have any of the symptoms listed here:

  • Increased risk of infections. You may be more likely to get new infections. Also, old infections may become active. Before and during treatment, tell your doctor if you see any signs of an infection. Contact your doctor at the first sign of an infection or fever. Signs of infection are fever, cough, vomiting, or diarrhea. Other signs may be flu or any open cuts or sores
  • Adrenal gland changes. When taking Acthar long term, your adrenal gland may produce too much of a hormone called cortisol, which may cause symptoms of Cushing's syndrome, such as upper body fat, rounded "moon" face, bruising easily, or muscle weakness
  • Sometimes when you stop taking Acthar long term, your body may not produce enough cortisol on its own. This is called "adrenal insufficiency." Your doctor may prescribe a steroid medicine to protect you until the adrenal gland recovers
  • Increased blood pressure, body salt, and fluid levels. Your doctor may check your blood pressure while you are being treated with Acthar. He or she may recommend some changes to your diet, such as eating less salt and taking certain supplements
  • Unpredictable response to vaccines. Talk to your doctor about which vaccines are safe to use when you are taking Acthar
  • Masking other conditions. Acthar may hide symptoms of other diseases. This can make it more difficult for your doctor to make a diagnosis if something else is going on
  • Stomach or intestinal problems. Acthar may put you at increased risk for bleeding from the stomach or getting stomach ulcers. Tell your doctor if you have stomach pains, bloody vomit, bloody or black stools, excessive tiredness, increased thirst, difficulty breathing, or increased heart rate
  • Changes in mood or behavior. Taking Acthar can make you feel irritable or depressed. You may also have mood swings or trouble sleeping
  • Worsening of other medical conditions. If you have other conditions, such as diabetes or muscle weakness, you may find they get worse
  • Eye problems. It's possible that you may develop certain eye conditions, such as cataracts, glaucoma, or optic nerve damage
  • Allergic reactions. Your body may develop antibodies or become sensitive when Acthar is used long term. Signs of allergic reaction in children are:
    • Skin rash
    • Swelling of the face, tongue, lips, or throat
    • Trouble breathing
  • Problems with growth and physical development. Using Acthar long term can affect growth and physical development in children. This can be reversed when Acthar is no longer needed
  • Bone density loss. Acthar may cause osteoporosis at any age
  • Potential harm to unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant

What are the most common side effects of Acthar?

The most common side effects of Acthar are similar to those of steroids. They include:

  • Fluid retention
  • Changes in blood sugar
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Behavior and mood changes
  • Changes in appetite and weight

Specific side effects in children under 2 years of age include:

  • Increased risk of infections
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Irritability
  • Symptoms of Cushing's syndrome
  • Cardiac hypertrophy (thickening of the heart muscle)
  • Weight gain

The above side effects may also be seen in adults and children over 2 years of age.

These are not all of the possible side effects of Acthar.

Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you, or that does not go away. Call your doctor or pharmacist for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA. Call 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects by calling 1-800-778-7898.

Please see full Prescribing Information.

H.P. Acthar® Gel [H P AK-thar jel]
(repository corticotropin injection)

What is H.P. Acthar Gel?

Acthar is a prescription medicine for the reduction of proteinuria in people with nephrotic syndrome of the idiopathic type (unknown origin) without uremia (accumulation of urea in the blood due to malfunctioning kidneys) or that due to lupus erythematosus (lupus).

Acthar is injected beneath the skin or into the muscle.

Important Safety Information

Who should not take Acthar?

You should not take Acthar if you have:

  • A skin condition called scleroderma
  • Bone density loss or osteoporosis
  • Any infections, including fungal, bacterial, or viral
  • Eye problems, such as ocular herpes simplex
  • Had recent surgery
  • Stomach ulcers or a history of ulcers
  • Heart problems
  • High blood pressure
  • Allergies to pig-derived proteins
  • Been recently given a vaccine or are about to take one
  • Suspected congenital infections (in children under 2 years of age)
  • A condition where your adrenal glands produce either too much of certain hormones (as with Cushing's syndrome), or not enough (adrenal insufficiency)

Tell your doctor if you have any of these conditions or any other health problems. Also, share with your doctor what medicines you are taking. Don't forget to mention nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

What is the most important information
I should know about Acthar?

  • Never inject Acthar directly into a vein, and always take Acthar as prescribed by your doctor
  • Never stop treatment suddenly unless your doctor tells you to
  • Try not to miss any scheduled doctor's appointments, as it is important for the doctor to monitor you while taking Acthar

Acthar can cause side effects similar to those with steroid treatments. While taking Acthar, tell your doctor right away if you have any of the symptoms listed here:

  • Increased risk of infections. You may be more likely to get new infections. Also, old infections may become active. Before and during treatment, tell your doctor if you see any signs of an infection. Contact your doctor at the first sign of an infection or fever. Signs of infection are fever, cough, vomiting, or diarrhea. Other signs may be flu or any open cuts or sores
  • Adrenal gland changes. When taking Acthar long term, your adrenal gland may produce too much of a hormone called cortisol, which may cause symptoms of Cushing's syndrome, such as upper body fat, rounded "moon" face, bruising easily, or muscle weakness
  • Sometimes when you stop taking Acthar long term, your body may not produce enough cortisol on its own. This is called "adrenal insufficiency." Your doctor may prescribe a steroid medicine to protect you until the adrenal gland recovers
  • Increased blood pressure, body salt, and fluid levels. Your doctor may check your blood pressure while you are being treated with Acthar. He or she may recommend some changes to your diet, such as eating less salt and taking certain supplements
  • Unpredictable response to vaccines. Talk to your doctor about which vaccines are safe to use when you are taking Acthar
  • Masking other conditions. Acthar may hide symptoms of other diseases. This can make it more difficult for your doctor to make a diagnosis if something else is going on
  • Stomach or intestinal problems. Acthar may put you at increased risk for bleeding from the stomach or getting stomach ulcers. Tell your doctor if you have stomach pains, bloody vomit, bloody or black stools, excessive tiredness, increased thirst, difficulty breathing, or increased heart rate
  • Changes in mood or behavior. Taking Acthar can make you feel irritable or depressed. You may also have mood swings or trouble sleeping
  • Worsening of other medical conditions. If you have other conditions, such as diabetes or muscle weakness, you may find they get worse
  • Eye problems. It's possible that you may develop certain eye conditions, such as cataracts, glaucoma, or optic nerve damage
  • Allergic reactions. Your body may develop antibodies or become sensitive when Acthar is used long term. Signs of allergic reaction in children are:
    • Skin rash
    • Swelling of the face, tongue, lips, or throat
    • Trouble breathing
  • Problems with growth and physical development. Using Acthar long term can affect growth and physical development in children. This can be reversed when Acthar is no longer needed
  • Bone density loss. Acthar may cause osteoporosis at any age
  • Potential harm to unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant

What are the most common side effects of Acthar?

The most common side effects of Acthar are similar to those of steroids. They include:

  • Fluid retention
  • Changes in blood sugar
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Behavior and mood changes
  • Changes in appetite and weight

Specific side effects in children under 2 years of age include:

  • Increased risk of infections
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Irritability
  • Symptoms of Cushing's syndrome
  • Cardiac hypertrophy (thickening of the heart muscle)
  • Weight gain

The above side effects may also be seen in adults and children over 2 years of age.

These are not all of the possible side effects of Acthar.

Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you, or that does not go away. Call your doctor or pharmacist for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA. Call 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects by calling 1-800-778-7898.

Please see full Prescribing Information.

H.P. Acthar® Gel [H P AK-thar jel]
(repository corticotropin injection)

What is H.P. Acthar Gel?

Acthar is a prescription medicine for the reduction of proteinuria in people with nephrotic syndrome of the idiopathic type (unknown origin) without uremia (accumulation of urea in the blood due to malfunctioning kidneys) or that due to lupus erythematosus (lupus).

Acthar is injected beneath the skin or into the muscle.